Blog

Prolonged Detention Stories: humanized, interactive legal brief

Prolonged Detention Stories is a website that humanizes, and makes interactive, a legal brief. It’s a simple and beautiful design, that lays out not only what legal arguments against prolonged detention are, but also puts human faces and scenarios on them. The group, a partnership of Community Initiatives for Visiting Immigrants in Confinement (CIVIC) and the

Continue Reading →

Evidence collection app for human rights abuses, eyeWitness

The International Bar Association has published the app eyeWitness, to allow people on the ground, in situations where atrocities are occurring, to gather evidence. The system they’ve set up also verifies this evidence. The central value is to help the gathering of court-admissible evidence, to help bring justice to those perpetrating crimes and empower human

Continue Reading →

IP Lawyer Training Game

The Business Development Bank of Canada has an online simulation game that’s meant for training in Intellectual Property as applied to entrepreneurs. It’s not necessarily built to train lawyers, but more for anyone who works with/as an entrepreneur to help spot IP and other legal issues and get started on dealing with them. Here are the

Continue Reading →

A Fourth Way for Law Students

I have been talking with lots of 2Ls, 3Ls, and newly minted JDs over the past year, about what other kinds of career tracks are open to young lawyers. I’ve been advising them not to take corporate jobs just to pay off debt or get experience (the default advice I was given coming out of

Continue Reading →

Constitute Project lets you search and compare legal texts

Constitute is an interesting new web-app/design that is all about examining the different constitutions. It lets you choose multiple constitutions to compare against each other, and also filter for certain types of terms and functions that you’re concerned with. You can put multiple documents next to each other, and then click on a certain topic

Continue Reading →

TermsFeed as a legal clause generator service

TermsFeed is an online legal service that lets any user (most often the owner of a website or an app) generate the legal terms and conditions they need to protect themselves and their users. It’s done by leading the user through a series of simple binary questions, and then delivering them a privacy policy, EULA, or

Continue Reading →

6 Core Principles of Good Legal Design

This post was originally published over on Stanford Legal Design Lab’s Medium publication, Legal Design and Innovation. Enjoy! Out of all the workshops, design cycles, and product development that we’ve worked on at the Legal Design Lab, there are a few key principles that have emerged. The concepts that have these types of features are

Continue Reading →

Lawbot as a chatbot lawyer for crim

A team from the University of Cambridge have launched Lawbot (BETA), an interactive conversational tool that can consult people on their possible legal situations. It’s a British tool, covering only criminal offenses in England and Wales. It lets people ask questions about their situation and figure out what the law would say. The team built

Continue Reading →

Participatory-Agile design cycle plan

I have been thinking about better ways to integrate the quick-development cycle of the Agile Design Process, and the community-driven spirit of Participatory Design. Here is my initial plan for what such a process would entail. The goal would be to run several of these cycles, in order to try out several different concepts rapidly.

Continue Reading →

Center for Civic Design and usable elections

Thanks to Aaron Stienstra for linking me to the Center for Civic Design, an effort to bring good design to elections and ballots. They are a non-profit who take information design, usability, and plain language to the cause of making election materials easier to comprehend and ballots easier to use. The Center publishes Field Guides

Continue Reading →

Does law school make students less creative?

Here is a short set of notes that are slightly provocative, aimed at both law school leaders and faculty, and the students who are choosing whether and how to attend law school. The notes come from a discussion in my Intro to Legal Design course, in which visiting guests and the law students discussed the

Continue Reading →

Legal Research primer as a coloring book

CALI has published a coloring book authored by three librarians, Elizabeth Gotauco, Nicole Dyszlewski, and Raquel M. Ortiz, that gives an introductory primer on how to do legal research. Along with essential information, it also provides line drawings for the reader to color in. The PDF version of the book is free online, so you

Continue Reading →

Social innovation with law schools as a driver

The dean of Osgoode Law School in Toronto, Lorne Sossin, has an interesting new post out about the new roles of law schools in developing problem-solvers and social change. He sees the rise of the new labs, courses, and professional tracks in law schools that focus on innovation and technology as a promise for law

Continue Reading →

Sparking 2 kinds of ‘Originals’ in legal innovation

I’ve been reading Wharton professor Adam Grant’s recent book Originals, that documents how new ideas and products emerge out of staid industries and bureaucracies. There’s a central point that he makes which links straight back to design thinking: The systems we live in need questioning — they need people to ask “Why, Why, Why, Why?” They need

Continue Reading →

The Bots Are Coming! (to legal services…)

Last week, it was great to see a short article making the rounds about a new chat-bot legal service coded and launched by a Stanford undergrad student, Joshua Browder. It’s DoNotPay, a bot that asks the user questions and figures out if they can get out of parking tickets or compensated for another ‘service gone

Continue Reading →

Do Lawyers want bad visual design?

I attended a design talk where startup and tech companies’ designers were sharing notes about what they’ve learned about what kinds of visual and interaction design best connect with users. One of the designers mentioned that you have to sometimes throw out the “core principles of good design” for certain audiences. He was talking about

Continue Reading →

Lessons from Personal Finance Design for Legal Design

Last week I went to an evening talk at Intuit, hearing from a collection of designers, technologists, and strategists working to make personal finance more engaging for laypeople. The panel was moderated by Leslie Witt (Design director of Intuit Small Businesses.), and had 4 thoughtful speakers: Mike Tschudy (head of design, Mint.com), Ben Knelman (CEO

Continue Reading →

White House Access to Justice forum

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the White House Forum on Increasing Access to Justice. It was a gathering of lawyers, judges, law clinic leaders, business-people, and politicians to talk about both the pressing needs for greater legal services (and innovations in how we pursue getting more legal services to more people), and

Continue Reading →

Interaction Designers on Making the Law Design-Friendly

Thanks to Kursat Ozenc for this link to a 15 minute video from designer Daniel Orbach, called Design, The Law, and You. Daniel Orbach – Design, the Law, and You from Interaction Design Association on Vimeo. It’s from an Interaction Design conference that happened in March in Finland. Here’s the abstract of the video: As

Continue Reading →

How can we visually represent legal arguments and rules?

During my February trip to Italy to talk about legal technology and improving the usability of courts, one of the points that got raised several times was: “How can we make effective visuals, that let both lay people and legal professionals easily understand: how the legal system and its procedures work how competing legal arguments

Continue Reading →

Branding access to justice

I was going back through my notebook from conferences I’ve been at for the past few months. One of the themes I was sketching out was about branding legal aid. How we can make access to justice and improving the legal system something that more people than just lawyers care about? Here are some of

Continue Reading →

Bringing XML machine-readability into Courts

I was lucky enough to go to Milan, Italy last month and participate in a judicial training there, where the topic was the potential of bringing technology into the legal system. One of the biggest initiatives being discussed was making legal documents and cases more machine-readable, interoperable, and ‘usable’ to court professionals and systems. Here

Continue Reading →

Design Process: go to the frustration

A notebook sketch I made for a class presentation on going from user research to brainstorming. The in-between step: scouting the frustrations — where your stakeholders and target audience are going nuts, hacking half-baked solutions, feeling exhausted and hating the current system. Those frustration points are opportunities. Because if you frame your new interventions as

Continue Reading →

Prof. Jay Mitchell on Visual Design For Lawyers

This afternoon, I had the privilege of hearing Professor Jay Mitchell of Stanford University (and director of the Transactions Clinic at the Law School) speak about the value of graphic design and sketching practices for lawyers. Jay has a book, Picturing Corporate Practice, coming out at the end of February, that brings a design approach

Continue Reading →

Canadian Bar Association report: Futures for young lawyers

The Canadian Bar Association has published a new report, Do law differently: Futures for Young Lawyers. It dives into the big questions facing people with new JDs and an uncertain legal industry. With profiles of many lawyers who are taking new career tracks and building unique portfolios of work, the report lays out new opportunities

Continue Reading →

California AG Kamala Harris on usable privacy

Yesterday, I attended the Stanford Cyber Initiative’s event with California Attorney General Kamala Harris. It was about the AG’s office release of the 2015 Data Breach report. Much of the talk resonated with legal design: how to make privacy policies and other legal rules and terms around data privacy more accessible to lay users. Here

Continue Reading →

Rapid prototyping on-site for access to justice designs

As I plan out what I might teach next quarter, I’m increasingly decided against having another classroom-based design class. I want to be in the field, where the users and service-providers of the legal system are, and where we can quickly spot failpoints and opportunities, create new interventions, test them, and improve from them. I

Continue Reading →

← Previous Page